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PhD Student Led Conferences

Call For Papers: Gender and the Political Academy

University of Cambridge, 2 May 2017

Convenors: Maha Rafi Atal and Kaitlin Ball

The Department of Politics and International Studies is pleased to invite submissions to its 2017 conference on Gender and the Political Academy.This conference will engage in and help to advance the dialogue surrounding gender issues in politics. From the appointment of Theresa May as Prime Minister to the presidential candidacy of Hillary Clinton, the past year has witnessed renewed debate about opportunities for and remaining barriers to women's advancement in political careers in and outside of higher education. New research has highlighted how gender affects the different ways individuals may experience a range of political issues from welfare provision to health care. Ventures such as Women Also Know Stuff and Foreign Policy Interrupted have drawn attention to the need for better mentorship and support for women in academic political science.

We particularly welcome papers that address the following topics:

Making and Surviving an Academic Career: Women pursuing an academic career face a diverse range of challenges, from implicit bias in grading at the undergraduate level, to the challenges of mentorship during postgraduate degrees and postdoctoral fellowships, to parental leave and the burdens of academic care labour. 

Gender and Political Epistemology: What role does gender play in our understanding of what the discipline of Politics is, both from a theoretical and a practical standpoint? Papers might consider the design of curricular, including the way core undergraduate and masters readings are selected, and the ways in which gender may colour a doctoral or postdoctoral researcher's fieldwork experience.

Will Women Save The Works? Assessing the Role of Female Politicians in a Time of Political Upheaval: 2016 saw unprecedented populist upheaval, which has rightly earned the focus of many political commentators. Unfortunately, this focus has overshadowed another important development: the growing numbers of women in leadership positions globally. Nevertheless, the United Nations failed to elect its first female leader, as did the United States. At a moment of global crisis with unprecedented mistrust in politics, we welcome papers that explore opportunities and obstacles for female politicians. 

 

Please submit a title and abstract of 300 words, as well as a CV, to kb558@cam.ac.uk by 1 March 2017. The Department is particularly eager to receive submissions from doctoral candidates and early career researchers.